Special Offers

Is social media bad for you! by Jessica Brown Part 2

What the science suggests so far about the impact of platforms such as Facebook, Twitter or Instagram on your mental well-being.

From the BBC Jan 5th 2018

Three billion people, around 40% of the world’s population, use online social media – and we’re spending an average of two hours every day, sharing, liking, tweeting and updating on these platforms, according to some reports. That breaks down to around half a million tweets and Snapchat photos shared every minute.

ADDICTION

Despite the argument from a few researchers that tweeting may be harder to resist than cigarettes and alcohol, social media addiction isn’t included in the latest diagnostic manual for mental health disorders.

That said, social media is changing faster than scientists can keep up with, so various groups are trying to study compulsive behaviours related to its use – for example, scientists from the Netherlands have invented their own scale to identify possible addiction.

And if social media addiction does exist, it would be a type of internet addiction – and that is a classified disorder. In 2011, Daria Kuss and Mark Griffiths from Nottingham Trent University in the UK have analysed 43 previous studies on the matter, and conclude that social media addiction is a mental health problem that “may” require professional treatment. They found that excessive usage was linked to relationship problems, worse academic achievement and less participation in offline communities, and found that those who could be more vulnerable to a social media addiction include those dependent on alcohol, the highly extroverted, and those who use social media to compensate for fewer ties in real life.

SELF-ESTEEM

Women’s magazines and their use of underweight and Photoshopped models have been long maligned for stirring self-esteem issues among young women. But now, social media, with its filters and lighting and clever angles, is taking over as a primary concern among some campaigning groups and charities.

Social media sites make more than half of users feel inadequate, according to a survey of 1,500 people by disability charity Scope, and half of 18- to 34-year-olds say it makes them feel unattractive.

A 2016 study by researchers at Penn State University suggested that viewing other people’s selfies lowered self-esteem, because users compare themselves to photos of people looking their happiest. Research from the University of Strathclyde, Ohio University and University of Iowa also found that women compare themselves negatively to selfies of other women.

Selfies may have downsides for the viewer (Credit: Getty Images)

But it’s not just selfies that have the potential to dent self-esteem. A study of 1,000 Swedish Facebook users found that women who spent more time on Facebook reported feeling less happy and confident. The researchers concluded: “When Facebook users compare their own lives with others’ seemingly more successful careers and happy relationships, they may feel that their own lives are less successful in comparison.”

But one small study hinted that viewing your own profile, not others, might offer ego boosts. Researchers at Cornell University in New York put 63 students into different groups. Some sat with a mirror placed against a computer screen, for instance, while others sat in front of their own Facebook profile.

Facebook had a positive effect on self-esteem compared to other activities that boost self-awareness. Mirrors and photos, the researchers explained, make us compare ourselves to social standards, whereas looking at our own Facebook profiles might boost self-esteem because it is easier to control how we’re presented to the world.

WELL-BEING

In a study from 2013, researchers texted 79 participants five times a day for 14 days, asking them how they felt and how much they’d used Facebook since the last text. The more time people spent on the site, the worse they felt later on, and the more their life satisfaction declined over time.

But other research has found, that for some people, social media can help boost their well-being. Marketing researchers Jonah Berger and Eva Buechel found that people who are emotionally unstable are more likely to post about their emotions, which can help them receive support and bounce back after negative experiences.

Overall, social media’s effects on well-being are ambiguous, according to a paper written last year by researchers from the Netherlands. However, they suggested there is clearer evidence for the impact on one group of people: social media has a more negative effect on the well-being of those who are more socially isolated.

In some cases, social media may enhance well-being (Credit: Getty Images)

RELATIONSHIPS

If you’ve ever been talking to a friend who’s pulled their phone out to scroll through Instagram, you might have wondered what social media is doing to relationships.

Even the mere presence of a phone can interfere with our interactions, particularly when we’re talking about something meaningful, according to one small study. Researchers writing in the Journal of Social and Personal Relationships tasked 34 pairs of strangers with having a 10-minute conversation about an interesting event that had happened to them recently. Each pair sat in private booths, and half had a mobile phone on the top of their table.

Those with a phone in eyeshot were less positive when recalling their interaction afterwards, had less meaningful conversations and reported feeling less close to their partner than the others, who had a notebook on top of the table instead.

Romantic relationships aren’t immune, either. Researchers at the University of Guelph in Canada surveyed 300 people aged 17-24 in 2009 about any jealousy they felt when on Facebook, asking questions such as, ‘How likely are you to become jealous after your partner has added an unknown member of the opposite sex?’.

Women spent much more time on Facebook then men, and experienced significantly more jealousy when doing so. The researchers concluded they “felt the Facebook environment created these feelings and enhanced concerns about the quality of their relationship”.

In one survey of 1,800 people, women reported being more stressed by social media than men (Credit: Getty Images)

ENVY

In a study involving 600 adults, roughly a third said social media made them feel negative emotions – mainly frustration – and envy was the main cause. This was triggered by comparing their lives to others’, and the biggest culprit was other people’s travel photos. Feeling envious caused an “envy spiral”, where people react to envy by adding to their profiles more of the same sort of content that made them jealous in the first place.

However, envy isn’t necessarily a destructive emotion – it can often make us work harder, according to researchers from Michigan University and the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. They asked 380 students to look at “envy-eliciting” photos and texts from Facebook and Twitter, including posts about buying expensive goods, travelling and getting engaged. But the type of envy the researchers found is “benign envy”, which they say is more likely to make a person work harder.

LONELINESS

A study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine last year surveyed 7,000 19- to 32-year-olds and found that those who spend the most time on social media were twice as likely to report experiencing social isolation, which can include a lack of a sense of social belonging, engagement with others and fulfilling relationships.

Spending more time on social media, the researchers said, could displace face-to-face interaction, and can also make people feel excluded.

“Exposure to such highly idealised representations of peers’ lives may elicit feelings of envy and the distorted belief that others lead happier and more successful lives, which may increase perceived social isolation.”

CONCLUSIONS?

It’s clear that in many areas, not enough is known yet to draw many strong conclusions. However, the evidence does point one way: social media affects people differently, depending on pre-existing conditions and personality traits.

As with food, gambling and many other temptations of the modern age, excessive use for some individuals is probably inadvisable. But at the same time, it would be wrong to say social media is a universally bad thing, because clearly it brings myriad benefits to our lives.

By Jessica Brown
From the BBC Jan 5th 2018
Posted in Health and Wellness, Life Strategy, Newsletter, Uncategorized

Maestro Urban

Posted in Health and Wellness, Life Strategy, Newsletter, Philosophy

No Loving Kindness

~a Zen Story

There was an old woman in china who had the support of a monk for over twenty years. She had built a little hut for him and fed him while he was meditating. Finally she wondered just what progress he had made in all this time.

To find out, she obtained the help of a girl rich in desire. “Go and embrace him” she told her, “and then ask him suddenly: “What now?””

The girl called upon the monk and without much ado caressed him, asking him what he was going to do about it.

“An old tree grows on a cold rock in winter,” replied the monk somewhat poetically. “Nowhere is there any warmth.”

The girl returned and repeated what he had said.

“To think that I fed that fellow for twenty years!” exclaimed the old woman in anger. “He showed no consideration for your need, no disposition to explain your condition. He need not have responded to passion, but at least he should have evidenced some compassion.”

She went at once to the house of the monk and burned it down

zp8497586rq
Posted in Meditation, Newsletter, Niei Chi, Philosophy, Traditional, Zen Story

Qi Gong and Meditation Seminar

Posted in Announcement, Buddhism, Health and Wellness, Life Strategy, Meditation, Newsletter, Niei Chi, Philosophy

Stream of Consciousness

Stream  - Classical Martial Arts Centre - Toronto Central Region - Martial Arts classes offered in Toronto - Adults and Children - Karate-Do, Jiu Jitsu, Self-Defense, Tai Chi Chuan, Chi Gung, Ba Gwa, Iaido, Jodo, Kobudo, Ancient Weaponry, Kali.

Posted in Cartoons, Mediation Resources (Web), Meditation, Newsletter, Niei Chi, Philosophy, Philosophy (menu)

Hanshi Platt’s Soup

Hanshi-Platt's-Soup - Classical Martial Arts Centre - Toronto Central Region - Martial Arts classes offered in Toronto - Adults and Children - Karate-Do, Jiu Jitsu, Self-Defense, Tai Chi Chuan, Chi Gung, Ba Gwa, Iaido, Jodo, Kobudo, Ancient Weaponry, Kali.

Tagged with: , ,
Posted in Life Strategy, Newsletter, Niei Chi, Note from Hanshi Platt, Philosophy, Philosophy (menu)

Is Social media bad for you? By Jessica Brown Part 1

What the science suggests so far about the impact of platforms such as Facebook, Twitter or Instagram on your mental well-being.

From the BBC Jan 5th 2018

Three billion people, around 40% of the world’s population, use online social media – and we’re spending an average of two hours every day, sharing, liking, tweeting and updating on these platforms, according to some reports. That breaks down to around half a million tweets and Snapchat photos shared every minute.

With social media playing such a big part in our lives, could we be sacrificing our mental health and well-being as well as our time? What does the evidence actually suggest?

Three billion people, around 40% of the world’s population, use online social media – and we’re spending an average of two hours every daysharing, liking, tweeting and updating on these platforms, according to some reports. That breaks down to around half a million tweets and Snapchat photos shared every minute.

Since social media is relatively new to us, conclusive findings are limited. The research that does exist mainly relies on self-reporting, which can often be flawed, and the majority of studies focus on Facebook. That said, this is a fast-growing area of research, and clues are beginning to emerge. BBC Future reviewed the findings of some of the science so far:

STRESS

People use social media to vent about everything from customer service to politics, but the downside to this is that our feeds often resemble an endless stream of stress. In 2015, researchers at the Pew Research Center based in Washington DC sought to find out if social media induces more stress than it relieves.

In the survey of 1,800 people, women reported being more stressed than men. Twitter was found to be a “significant contributor” because it increased their awareness of other people’s stress.

But Twitter also acted as a coping mechanism – and the more women used it, the less stressed they were. The same effect wasn’t found for men, whom the researchers said had a more distant relationship with social media. Overall, the researchers concluded that social media use was linked to “modestly lower levels” of stress.

The presence of a phone affects the quality of conversation, some studies suggest (Credit: Getty Images)

MOOD

In 2014, researchers in Austria found that participants reported lower moods after using Facebook for 20 minutes compared to those who just browsed the internet. The study suggested that people felt that way because they saw it as a waste of time.

A good or bad mood may also spread between people on social media, according to researchers from the University of California, who assessed the emotional content of over a billion status updates from more than 100 million Facebook users between 2009 and 2012.

Bad weather increased the number of negative posts by 1%, and the researchers found that one negative post by someone in a rainy city influenced another 1.3 negative posts by friends living in dry cities. The better news is that happy posts had a stronger influence; each one inspired 1.75 more happy posts. Whether a happy post translates to a genuine boost in mood, however, remains unclear.

ANXIETY

Researchers have looked at general anxiety provoked by social media, characterised by feelings of restlessness and worry, and trouble sleeping and concentrating. A study published in the journal Computers and Human Behaviour found that people who report using seven or more social media platforms were more than three times as likely as people using 0-2 platforms to have high levels of general anxiety symptoms.

That said, it’s unclear if and how social media causes anxiety. Researchers from Babes-Bolyai University in Romania reviewed existing research on the relationship between social anxiety and social networking in 2016, and said the results were mixed. They concluded that more research needs to be done.

Social media mimics many of the rewards of games and play, which can pose an attractive lure (Credit: Getty Images)

DEPRESSION

While some studies have found a link between depression and social media use, there is emerging research into how social media can actually be a force for good.

Two studies involving more than 700 students found that depressive symptoms, such as low mood and feelings of worthlessness and hopelessness, were linked to the quality of online interactions. Researchers found higher levels of depressive symptoms among those who reported having more negative interactions.

A similar study conducted in 2016 involving 1,700 people found a threefold risk of depression and anxiety among people who used the most social media platforms. Reasons for this, they suggested, include cyber-bullying, having a distorted view of other people’s lives, and feeling like time spent on social media is a waste.

However, as BBC Future will explore this month in our #LikeMinded season, scientists are also looking at how social media can be used to diagnose depression, which could help people receive treatment earlier. Researchers for Microsoft surveyed 476 people and analysed their Twitter profiles for depressive language, linguistic style, engagement and emotion. From this, they developed a classifier that can accurately predict depression before it causes symptoms in seven out of 10 cases.

Researchers from Harvard and Vermont Universities analysed 166 people’s Instagram photos to create a similar tool last year with the same success rate.

SLEEP

Humans used to spend their evenings in darkness, but now we’re surrounded by artificial lighting all day and night. Research has found that this can inhibit the body’s production of the hormone melatonin, which facilities sleep – and blue light, which is emitted by smartphone and laptop screens, is said to be the worst culprit. In other words, if you lie on the pillow at night checking Facebook and Twitter, you’re headed for restless slumber.

Last year, researchers from the University of Pittsburgh asked 1,700 18- to 30-year-olds about their social media and sleeping habits. They found a link with sleep disturbances – and concluded blue light had a part to play. How often they logged on, rather than time spent on social media sites, was a higher predictor of disturbed sleep, suggesting “an obsessive ‘checking’”, the researchers said.

The researchers say this could be caused by physiological arousal before sleep, and the bright lights of our devices can delay circadian rhythms. But they couldn’t clarify whether social media causes disturbed sleep, or if those who have disturbed sleep spend more time on social media.

One of the worst times to use social media may be just before bed (Credit: Getty Images)

By Jessica Brown
From the BBC Jan 5th 2018
Posted in Health and Wellness, Life Strategy, Newsletter, Scanned Articles

Richard Kim, 20th Century Samurai

Sensei Richard Kim - Classical Martial Arts Centre - Toronto Central Region - Martial Arts classes offered in Toronto - Adults and Children - Karate-Do, Jiu Jitsu, Self-Defense, Tai Chi Chuan, Chi Gung, Ba Gwa, Iaido, Jodo, Kobudo, Ancient Weaponry, Kali.

by Michael Haering 

Sensei Richard Kim - Classical Martial Arts Centre - Toronto Central Region - Martial Arts classes offered in Toronto - Adults and Children - Karate-Do, Jiu Jitsu, Self-Defense, Tai Chi Chuan, Chi Gung, Ba Gwa, Iaido, Jodo, Kobudo, Ancient Weaponry, Kali.The place looks not unlike a typical college classroom.  Fifteen to 20 people crowd around a couple of long, conference tables sandwiched together in the middle of a large room.  Another 20 students spill into folding chairs perched against the paint-chipped walls or sit precariously on an old steam radiator, legs swinging languidly and eyes locked rigidly on the absentminded-looking professor type conducting the class.

But on second glance, the similarity to a structured college classroom scene is only superficial.  One difference – the disparity in the age range, dress, demeanor and obvious social backgrounds of the students – is too broad to fit the general uniformity and air of forced casualness prevalent in most university courses.

Another differences that sets these people apart for the typical college class is the attitude of the myriad group.  Virtually to a man, they all share the enthusiastic interest and the avid fascination of the true aficionado – not the studious but bored complacency of students who have to sit through a required course to satisfy a degree requirement.

But mostly, the big difference is the awe and respect they all seem to hold for the man holding court at the head of the table.  To them, he’s more than just a teacher or a lecturer.  He’s a aster storyteller who has his flock spellbound with romantic and exciting tales of a glorious by bygone era many of the individuals in the room would probably give their eyeteeth to have been a part of.

The course is a free class in martial arts philosophy and history offered at the YMCA in the heart of San Francisco’s Chinatown.  The instructor is a man whose name is as familiar to most martial arts practitioners as the crew cut and bow tie he sports.  He’s Richard Kim, author, historian, instructor, and one of the guiding lights of the world-wide Butokukai Association.

Sensei Kim and Yoshido Kataro - Classical Martial Arts Centre - Toronto Central Region - Martial Arts classes offered in Toronto - Adults and Children - Karate-Do, Jiu Jitsu, Self-Defense, Tai Chi Chuan, Chi Gung, Ba Gwa, Iaido, Jodo, Kobudo, Ancient Weaponry, Kali.THIRTY YEARS ago Kim posed with Yoshida Kotaro in Yokohama.  Kim’s mother believed that martial arts could teach a person respect, while the bushido aspect of Japanese arts compelled Mrs. Kim to have her son learn judo. (right)

Kim’s tone, bearing and attitude are those of an academic, a man who derives as much joy from learning as he does from teaching.  “Basically,” says the 58-year-old martial artist, explaining the purpose of his class, “the philosophy of the samurai was enlightenment.  This is the conclusion that the martial arts masters and the samurai came to and which I learned in all the years I’ve been involved.”

Kim is one of the few contemporary instructors in America to carry on that code of “enlightenment” with a degree of thoroughness and expertise that would rival the efforts of a Harvard professor.  Aside from the regular classes he teaches every Saturday at the Chinatown “Y”, he also authors a monthly philosophy column for BLACK BELT magazine’s sister publication KARATE ILLUSTRATED and lectures at a summer cap held by the All American Karate Federation every year at the University of California at San Gabriel.

All of his teaching activities, by the way, he performs for free, including the karate course he teaches prior to his philosophy classes.  “It’s more of an avocation with me,” he explains modestly.  The philosophy aspect of his teaching, however, may be more int eh nature of compulsion, rather than avocation.  He has a fervent belief that the cultural background of the arts is as important for a student to understand as is the application of a basic technique.  “On a purely physical basis,” Kim explains, “there is no difference between man and animal… But man is different from the animal in that man is a spiritual person.  Being a spiritual person,” Kim insists, “he needs philosophy.”

The middle-aged sensei has had plenty of years of experience to collect material for his philosophy classes.  His baptism of fire int eh martial arts came about almost 50 years ago in Hawaii, where his mother insisted he take up judo.  “My mother made me,” he laughs, “and I hated it ever since.  She thought that the martial arts could make a person learn respect.  The way she put it, “the respect that one human being owes to another you can only learn in a combative environment…”  She felt that the tenets of the Japanese martial arts being bushido would make a person, at lest, have respect for other human beings, and she felt that respect is the only achievement.

Hi mother’s viewpoint that a combat environment breeds respect seems to be somewhat of a paradoxical statement, but Kim explains it away simply.  “The martial arts are in an environment that’s combative,” he says.  “But it is like being int he eye of a typhoon because it is highly philosophical – it’s not fighting.  Street fighting on the other hand is combative but it is not philosophical.”

Kim won his fits black belt in judo in 1941 but two years prior to that, he toured China and studied tai chi and pakua under, “Chien Chen Wa, that’s how I pronounce it,” he laughs.  in addition to the Chinese arts, he also studied daito ryu jujitsu, and shorinjiryu kenpo karate.  It was during this period, in fact, that Kim made a tour of the Orient with the express purpose of studying the different martial arts.

When war broke out between Japan and the United States, in 1941, he was visiting Japan and was unable to return to his home in Hawaii.  but he used the war years to learn as much about Japanese karate as he could, and he became particularly enamored with the philosophy behind it.  “Japanese training,” he says, “is philosophical, diametrically opposed to the Chinese training even though it may appear to be the same.

“All the martial arts tell you that the first move is defensive, that’s the premise of the martial arts.  But the connotation takes in a very wide area.  Most people, if you tell them their first move mst be defensive, will wait for the enemy to hit and then counter.  Now, with the Japanese saurai mentality, the fight starts when the issue or challenge comes up – an offensive, defensive move.

“For example,” he explains, “suppose you and I get into an argument and you were the kung fu champion of Shanghai.  We would argue, say in a restaurant, and then we go out int he street.  As soon as you square off, I hit you because the fight started in the restaurant.   It is a defensive move but looks like an offense and lot of people cannot see that.

“That is where the Japanese karate training – what I call true karate- – has the advantage.  A lot of people do not understand the semantics, for instance, of the karate man never delivering the first blow.  Semantically, you would envision a karate man standing there waiting to respond to a blow.  but once there is a challenge, the contact has begun and you defend with an offensive defense.”

Kim’s travels in the Orient also introduced him to the various Chinese styles.  In addition to the soft styles of tai chi and pakua, he studied, he had an opportunity to take a look a the harder styles which have come into vogue recently.  And, from personal experience, he seemed to be pretty much unimpressed by them.

“My only involvement with the hard style kung fu in China,” Kim recalls with a good-natured laugh, “was six bouts with kung fu champs, and I knocked them all out.  that was it.  That’s why I’m convinced that a combination of judo, Japanse karate, and Chinese tai chi and pakua can take care of any hard style kung fu people.

“The kung fu people,” he explains again, referring tot he hard stylists, “fight along one style – it’s whatever particular school they follow, and they are not flexible… Their efficiency is so highly specialized… you have deficiencies because it is a very narrow field.  The specialty calls for that.  But I have found that the person who is a generalist has an advantage in a physical encounter.”

Sensei Richard Kim - Classical Martial Arts Centre - Toronto Central Region - Martial Arts classes offered in Toronto - Adults and Children - Karate-Do, Jiu Jitsu, Self-Defense, Tai Chi Chuan, Chi Gung, Ba Gwa, Iaido, Jodo, Kobudo, Ancient Weaponry, Kali.

Physically speaking, Kim sees no difference between man and animal but, because humans are spiritual, he believes people nee philosophy.  Expressing practial views on defensive arts, the instructor feels a combination of Japanese karate, judo, and Chinese tai chi and pakua would be the winning formula against any hard style kung fu.

Sensei Richard Kim - Classical Martial Arts Centre - Toronto Central Region - Martial Arts classes offered in Toronto - Adults and Children - Karate-Do, Jiu Jitsu, Self-Defense, Tai Chi Chuan, Chi Gung, Ba Gwa, Iaido, Jodo, Kobudo, Ancient Weaponry, Kali.

It’s just for that reason that he’s so impressed by the softer styles that stress not just physical flexibility, but back to his favorite topic, philosophical flexibility.  “You’d be surprised,” he says earnestly.  “In my experience, the best fighters are the tai chi people.  They can beat any of the hard style kung fu schools if came to the nitty gritty because they and the pakua people are philosophically flexible.  You see, they can extrapolate from any situation and even follow back on an attack that being give out.”

It’s apparent, even to the most uninitiated in the arts, Kim is the personification of the classical martial artist.  Yet, interestingly enough, despite his infatuation and deep abiding interest in the traditional tenets of budo, his views on the arts, particularly the sport aspect, are as contemporary as the brashest young black belt’s.  He welcomes the recent full contact trend and he’s even enthusiastic over the potential benefits it can lend to classical karate.  “If it’s done right,” he insists, “I think it will help classical karate.. Contact karate does not step on traditional karate.  Traditional karate is, just to use another expression, a different kind of animal.”

Nevertheless, he hastens to add, “Professional karate is not a martial art – bushido and all.  It’s a sport like boxing, and it’s a different arena…, but not everybody can participate in it.  But classical karate, anybody can engage in it because you get taught respect and dignity of one human being over another.  Also, it give you some means of self defense in case your life is on the line.  That what it’s meant for.  It is not meant for some guy to go in the ring and be the Cassius Clay of karate.”

In the same vein, Kim doesn’t appear to be too concerned as many traditionalists are, that the arts are moving too far away from the classical heritage, as long as the philosophical aspects are left intact.  “It has changed in America and probably Japan,” he concedes  “but the purist – a true karate man – his art, as he teaches, is exactly as those before him.  Karate in America has changed because the styles have been simplified, but this is all on the physical level… Students we turn out may be a high on a physical level, but if he moves to the sporting arena -which has wide appeal – he must not lose the philosophical.  That is why we separate the amateur from the professional.”

To Kim, the philosophy and the arts are inseparable.  On virtually every topic he touches on, as far as the martial arts are concerned, he uses the word over and over again.  But as it’s been pointed out, it’s not a stodgy, unalterable view.  He applies the lessons he’s learned from the old masters to the newer concepts brought out by his contemporaries.  And that too, is an idea he borrowed from the past – the samurai tradition of enlightenment.

Sensei Richard Kim - Classical Martial Arts Centre - Toronto Central Region - Martial Arts classes offered in Toronto - Adults and Children - Karate-Do, Jiu Jitsu, Self-Defense, Tai Chi Chuan, Chi Gung, Ba Gwa, Iaido, Jodo, Kobudo, Ancient Weaponry, Kali.

Tagged with: ,
Posted in Masters, Newsletter, Philosophy, Scanned Articles

A Dream Come True: Kirin Ad

Posted in Humour, Newsletter, Niei Chi, Video

Maya Angelou

Maya Angelou quotes: ‘Try to be a rainbow in someone’s cloud’

Maya

With the death of Maya Angelou, we lose the immense wisdom of the celebrated African American author, poet and civil activist. These quotes say a lot about who she was and what she stood for.

  • Never make someone a priority when all you are to them is an option.
  • If you don’t like something, change it. If you can’t change it, change your attitude. Don’t complain.
  • There is no greater agony than bearing an untold story inside you.
  • I do not trust people who don’t love themselves and yet tell me, ‘I love you.’ There is an African saying which is: Be careful when a naked person offers you a shirt.
  • We delight in the beauty of the butterfly, but rarely admit the changes it has gone through to achieve that beauty.
  • You may not control all the events that happen to you, but you can decide not to be reduced by them.
  • My mission in life is not merely to survive, but to thrive; and to do so with some passion, some compassion, some humor, and some style.
  • Try to be a rainbow in someone’s cloud.
  • I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.
  • I love to see a young girl go out and grab the world by the lapels. Life’s a bitch. You’ve got to go out and kick ass.
  • The love of the family, the love of the person can heal. It heals the scars left by a larger society. A massive, powerful society.
  • Courage is the most important of all the virtues because without courage, you can’t practice any other virtue consistently.
  • Nothing will work unless you do.
  • It’s one of the greatest gifts you can give yourself, to forgive. Forgive everybody.
  • I’ve learned that you can tell a lot about a person by the way (s)he handles these three things: a rainy day, lost luggage, and tangled Christmas tree lights.

Caged Bird

BY MAYA ANGELOU

A free bird leaps
on the back of the wind
and floats downstream
till the current ends
and dips his wing
in the orange sun rays
and dares to claim the sky.

But a bird that stalks
down his narrow cage
can seldom see through
his bars of rage
his wings are clipped and
his feet are tied
so he opens his throat to sing.

The caged bird sings
with a fearful trill
of things unknown
but longed for still
and his tune is heard
on the distant hill
for the caged bird
sings of freedom.

The free bird thinks of another breeze
and the trade winds soft through the sighing trees
and the fat worms waiting on a dawn bright lawn
and he names the sky his own

But a caged bird stands on the grave of dreams
his shadow shouts on a nightmare scream
his wings are clipped and his feet are tied
so he opens his throat to sing.

The caged bird sings
with a fearful trill
of things unknown
but longed for still
and his tune is heard
on the distant hill
for the caged bird
sings of freedom.

 

Posted in Audio, Humour, Life Strategy, Newsletter, Philosophy
Categories
Post History
January 2018
SMTWTFS
« Dec  
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031