Special Offers

Balance?

Posted in Humour, Newsletter

A additional class for younglings 4, 5 & 6 on Saturday mornings at Renge Dojo 1431 Yonge St

Beginning Saturday 29nd of September:

We will add a class for the 4, 5 & 6 yrs at 10.30-11.15, fo maintain our good teacher student ratio.

If this causes you a scheduling problem for you, please let me know. – We will work around it.

Children's Karate Class - Classical Martial Arts Centre - Toronto Central Region

Children’s classes

New Class: Ages 4, 5 & 6 yrs at 10.30-11.15 

Ages 7 & 8 yrs at 11.30 – 12.15

If you can bring your 8 yr old to the 11.30 class please do so, if not, please let me know. – We will work around it.

No change to the other age ranges or class times.

Ages 9 & 10 yrs at 12.30 – 1.30

Ages 11 – 14 yrs at 12.30 – 1.45

Adult classes: – (No changes)

Adult  White & Yellow 1.45 – 3.00,
Adult  Orange, Green 1.45 – 3.15,
Adult  Blue, brown 1.45 – 3.30,
Adult  Mudansha 1.45 – 3.45,
Adult  Black Belts 1.45 – 4.00.
Gambate
Sensei
Posted in Announcement, Newsletter

Do This Kind of Exercise If You Want to Live Longer, Study Says By JAMIE DUCHARME

September 4, 2018
TIME Health

Experts like to say the best form of exercise is whatever kind you’ll actually do. But a new study finds that people who do team sports may be at an advantage over solitary exercisers.

The social interaction involved in partner and team sports may compound the plentiful benefits of physical activity, adding more years to your life than solo exercise, according to a study published Tuesday in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Tennis, badminton and soccer are all better for longevity than cycling, swimming, jogging or gym exercise, according to the research.

“For both mental and physical well-being and longevity, we’re understanding that our social connections are probably the single-most important feature of living a long, healthy, happy life,” says study co-author Dr. James O’Keefe, a cardiologist at Saint Luke’s Mid America Heart Institute. “If you’re interested in exercising for health and longevity and well-being, perhaps the most important feature of your exercise regimen is that it should involve a playdate.”

The study was based on data from about 8,500 adults who were part of the Copenhagen City Heart Study. All of the people were white, and none had a history of heart disease, stroke or cancer, so the findings may be limited to this narrow population. They completed a comprehensive health and lifestyle questionnaire, which included questions about type and frequency of physical activity, and were monitored by the researchers for around 25 years, during which time about 4,500 died.

Though many of the participants reported doing multiple physical activities each week, they were asked to designate one as their primary form of exercise. The researchers used these answers to look for associations with longevity, and adjusted for factors including socioeconomic background, education and drinking.

After doing so, they noticed a clear correlation between social sports and longevity. Compared to sedentary people, they found that those who reported playing tennis as their main form of exercise could expect to add 9.7 years to their lifespan, followed by badminton (6.2 years), soccer (4.7 years), cycling (3.7 years), swimming (3.4 years), jogging (3.2 years), calisthenics (3.1 years) and health club activities (1.5 years).

How long people typically spent doing these activities varied greatly — but duration didn’t necessarily affect longevity benefits. Those who played tennis for their primary sport got about 520 minutes of physical activity per week, and picked up the racquet for about 100 of those minutes. Meanwhile, health club exercise finished last in terms of longevity, even though gym goers reported the most weekly activity overall: almost 600 minutes in total, about 150 of them at the gym.

Plenty of research supports a link between social interaction and good health, including recent research published in The Lancet that found team sports are the best physical activity for mental health. Partner sports also tend to be more enjoyable than solitary exercise, O’Keefe says, which can potentially enhance mental health and increase long-term adherence to an exercise routine. Plenty of research has also shown that moderate exercise tends to be as good or better for longevity than vigorous activities such as running, which can take a toll on the body over time.

“When we try to just go and work out to get our heart rate up, it still feels good,” O’Keefe says. “But it doesn’t leave you as relaxed and happy as, say, going to play a game of basketball or golf.”

Tennis likely took the top spot because “it’s intensely interactive,” O’Keefe says. “At every point you’re talking. It’s just a very natural way to emotionally bond with people, besides getting your exercise.” (O’Keefe adds that the study may not have been able to fully account for the fact that wealthier, better-educated people — who tend to be healthier to begin with — may be more likely to play tennis.)

Activities like running and weight-lifting still extend your life, according to the study’s findings, and offer plenty of other health benefits, from strength to cardiovascular health. But for optimal benefits, O’Keefe says gym goers may want to consider supplementing those workouts with activities that foster social connection.

“Any exercise is better than none,” O’Keefe says. But “when our physical activity also allows us to play, it basically magnifies the benefits, because you get not only the musculoskeletal and cardiovascular benefits of physical exercise, but you also get that emotional bonding, which turns out to be probably just as important.”

O’Keefe, whose exercise regimen typically includes running and weightlifting, says he’s even changed his own behavior because of the study: He and his family have picked up badminton. “You can’t play badminton without feeling like a kid again,” he says. “It’s just pure fun.”

For more, visit TIME Health.

http://time.com/5384491/best-exercise-for-longevity/

Posted in Fitness, Health and Wellness, Life Strategy, Newsletter, Science

The Guest House

This being human is a guest house.
Every morning a new arrival.

A joy, a depression, a meanness,
some momentary awareness comes
as an unexpected visitor.

Welcome and entertain them all!
Even if they are a crowd of sorrows,
who violently sweep your house
empty of its furniture,
still, treat each guest honorably.

He may be clearing you out
for some new delight.

The dark thought, the shame, the malice.
meet them at the door laughing and invite them in.

Be grateful for whatever comes.
because each has been sent
as a guide from beyond.

~ Rumi, translation by Coleman Barks

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Posted in Newsletter, Philosophy

Grading results 15 September 2018

Karate-Do: Youth and Children

3rd Kyu – Green Belt

Matthew Wong, (Yamazakura)

Sarisha Panday,

Ryan Ren,

Ian Simons – (Work in Progress)

4th Kyu – Orange

William Peterson.

4th Kyu – Yellow/Orange

Tanzeel Ahmed,

Divya Moraes.

White/Yellow

Priya Moraes,

Rohan Moraes.

Outstanding Performance

Mathew Wong.

Posted in Announcement, Newsletter

Dharma the cat

Posted in Humour, Newsletter

A very Slight adjustment to Renge Dojo Saturday schedule 1431 Yonge St

No change for Saturday September 22nd

Beginning in 2 weeks time, Saturday 29nd of September:

We will add a class for the 4, 5 & 6 yrs at 10.30-11.15, fo maintain our good teacher student ratio.

If this causes a scheduling problem for me, please let me know.

Children's Karate Class - Classical Martial Arts Centre - Toronto Central Region

Children’s classes

New Class: Ages 4, 5 & 6 yrs at 10.30-11.15 

Ages 7 & 8 yrs at 11.30 – 12.15

If you can bring your 8 yr old to the 11.30 class please do so, if not that is fine.

No change to the other age ranges or class times.

Ages 9 & 10 yrs at 12.30 – 1.30

Ages 11 – 14 yrs at 12.30 – 1.45

Adult classes: – (No changes)

Adult  White & Yellow 1.45 – 3.00,
Adult  Orange, Green 1.45 – 3.15,
Adult  Blue, brown 1.45 – 3.30,
Adult  Mudansha 1.45 – 3.45,
Adult  Black Belts 1.45 – 4.00.
Gambate
Sensei
Posted in Announcement, Newsletter

Thich Nhat Hanh: On Birth and Death

Posted in Buddhism, Life Strategy, Masters, Meditation, Newsletter, Philosophy, Video

Teaching women self-defence still the best way to reduce sexual assaults: From Senpai Phillips PHD

Globe & Mail

Resistance tactics

A landmark Canadian study instructed participants on how to confront the risk of sexual assault on campus, reports Erin Anderssen. While it’s a partial solution – and an imperfect one – research shows resistance tactics work

Lindsey Boyes, 22, took the course for extra credit in first-year psychology at the University of Calgary four years ago. She calls it a “paradigm shift” that corrected her own confusion about consent, and lifted the guilt she felt about a sexual assault during her teen years. She describes the program as “useful and necessary for where we are now as a society.” But, she says, “it’s a Band-Aid. It doesn’t get at the root of the problem.” (Todd Korol for The Globe and Mail)

In the debate over how to reduce sexual assault on university campuses, proposing self-defence classes for women is controversial. Women aren’t the problem, the reasoning goes, so why is changing their behaviour the solution? Putting the onus on women to drop-kick rapists, map out safe walks home, or geo-track their drinks at parties, writes the rules in the wrong direction. And it swerves too easily into victim-blaming.

But, according to new landmark Canadian research, it works. The study, published Thursday in the New England Journal of Medicine, found that the Canadian-designed intervention, which focuses on teaching women how to detect risk in situations that could lead to sexual assault and defend themselves when necessary, reduced the rate of rape among participants by nearly 50 per cent. At a time when universities are facing harsh criticism for mishandling sexual assault, when the White House has called for action to reduce sexual violence on campus, when it’s estimated that as many as one in four female university students may be assaulted before they finish their degree, is it responsible to deny young women access to a tried-and-tested program?

Lindsey Boyes, 22, took the course for extra credit in first-year psychology at the University of Calgary four years ago. She calls it a “paradigm shift” that corrected her own confusion about consent, and lifted the guilt she felt about a sexual assault during her teen years. She describes the program as “useful and necessary for where we are now as a society.” But, she says, “it’s a Band-Aid. It doesn’t get at the root of the problem.” (Todd Korol for The Globe and Mail)

The four-year study tracked nearly 900 women at three Canadian universities, randomly selecting half to take the 12-hour “resistance” program, and compared them to a second group who received only brochures, similar to those available at a health clinic. One year later, the incidence of reported rape among women who took the program was 5.2 per cent, compared to 9.8 per cent in the control group; the gap in incidents of attempted rape was even wider.

The discomfiting part: Potential victims are still shouldering the burden for their own safety.

“There are no quick fixes,” says lead author Charlene Senn, a women’s studies professor at the University of Windsor. “We need multiple strategies. But we now know that giving women the right skills, and building the confidence that they can use them, does decrease their experience with sexual violence. This is our best short-term strategy while we wait for cultural change.”

On the first of four Thursday evening sessions, Lindsey Boyes had to leave the room. She was shaking. The facilitator had just finished explaining how the Canadian Criminal Code says consent cannot be given when a person is incapacitated and intoxicated.

“It felt like she was talking directly to me,” recalls Ms. Boyes, who joined the study for extra credit in her first-year psychology class at the University of Calgary.

When Ms. Boyes was 16, she’d gotten drunk at a party. An older boy – “the most popular guy” at her small-town school, she recalls – offered to help her find a place to sleep because her girlfriends had already left. She remembers throwing up, a lot, and then flashes of him on top of her in bed. “Afterwards, he said, ‘Don’t worry, I won’t tell anybody.’” But word spread, and she went from being a virgin to a “slut” in one night. Even her friends told her, “You shouldn’t have gotten so drunk.” They were right, she decided, it was her fault.

Now, in this class, she was learning for the first time to see what happened as a crime for which she was not to blame. “It was pretty intense,” recalls Ms. Boyes, now 22, who is going into her fourth year of a commerce degree. “It was a complete paradigm shift for me.”

The prevention program is a modern step from those old-school, self-defence classes that suggested, misleadingly, that the biggest risks come from empty parking garages and strangers leaping from bushes. Participants are reminded in the first of four classes that at least 80 per cent of sexual assaults are perpetrated by someone the victim knows.

Eight hundred and ninety-three women were recruited mostly from first-year psychology classes at the Universities of Windsor, Calgary and Guelph. They ranged in age from 17 to 24. Half of them were living in residence. The women in the study were randomly selected into two comparable groups. Retention was high; about 90 per cent of women assigned to the intervention group completed at least three of the four session in the 12-hour program.

Prior to taking the study, the rate of self-reported rape since age 14 in the entire group was 23 per cent, a number that may be higher than average because women with a history of sexual violence might have been more likely to volunteer for the study. But, at the same time, it’s estimated that one in four university women will be sexual assaulted during their four years on campus. This figure is based largely on a Canadian study more than a decade old, and is the subject of some debate, but American research also suggests rates between 14 and 26 per cent.

In surveys, participants were asked to finish this sentence, “If a man I know, either a date or acquaintance, tried to force me to have sex with him, I would….” The group on the left is the control group; on the right, the women who received the intervention. These numbers show results one week after the intervention, and a year later. Women who took the program were more likely to say they would use force – the most effective strategy for stopping an assault.
The study tracked sexual assault among participants. The numbers above show actual counts of reported non-consensual sexual activity up to one year later. In all categories, the rates for the group receiving the intervention were consistently lower. The rate of rape was reduced by half. Researchers believe this is because women learned to avoid risky situations, and were more likely to stop coercive behaviour before it escalated.

“The keys in the eyes are not going to work around your girlfriend’s boyfriend,” Prof. Senn likes to say. She cites studies that show women are the least likely to use force against acquaintances and friends, that perpetrators are more likely to lead with charm and alcohol than overt aggression. The course covers how to escape a choke hold, and ways to get out from underneath someone on a bed, but focuses on how to prevent situations from going that far. The most powerful part of a woman’s body, participants are told, is her voice. One of the central messages in the course: Don’t worry about being polite. Trust your instincts.

“As women we are really taught not to offend, not to be rude to people,” says Heidi Fischer, now 25, who participated in the study during her first year at the University of Guelph. “It’s about getting in touch with your gut.”

The course has four goals: to teach women common scenarios for sexual assault, how to recognize potential predators, how to evade danger (including through self-defence), and how to think about sexuality and relationships in terms of their own desires and boundaries.

Prof. Senn says the course stresses that learning skills does not mean women are to blame when an assault occurs; they also receive information on their rights, and how to file a complaint. (Ninety per cent of participants attended at least three of the three-hour sessions. Researchers offered small cash incentives, as is standard in trials, and guaranteed anonymity in the surveys. While researchers couldn’t follow up on assaults, women were given material after completing surveys reminding them how to seek help.)

Natalie Hope, 22, took the course in her freshman year at the University of Guelph. “I realized there were so many times as a teenager that I was blind to what was going on,” she says. “I really felt it was something I should have learned sooner.” One take-home lesson: Don’t disappear from your girlfriends; tell everyone where you are going. “We had a code phrase,” Ms. Hope says. “If someone said, ‘Oh, I like your shoes,’ it meant ‘I am uncomfortable, get me away.’” The course helped clarify her own comfort zone. Today, “I feel in control because I know what I expect.” (Galit Rodan for the Globe and Mail)

The participants interviewed for this story could all give examples of ways they had used what they learned. They mentioned covering their drinks, being aware of their environment, speaking up sooner when a situation felt risky even if it meant offending someone. Six months after taking the course, Ms. Boyes was alone in a car with a first date, when he started to make her uncomfortable. “He was getting pretty pushy, and I told him to take me home,” she says. “I am not sure I would have been that direct before.”

“I pay more attention to what I am doing, how I am acting toward people,” says Jenna Harris, 21, who is going into her fourth year at the University of Windsor. “I make sure I don’t lead someone on,” including accepting drinks from a stranger. She practises the buddy system at parties and bars, and she is more careful about her own alcohol consumption, because, she says, “if you are responsible for your friends, you are responsible for yourself as well.”

While they called the material “empowering,” and described sharing what they learned with friends, the women also said they felt conflicted. “It’s keeping me safe, but it’s not keeping everybody safe,” Ms. Fischer says. “Why are we teaching women to be afraid, women to be cautious, instead of teaching men not to be perpetrators?”

Attacking the root, however, has proven more difficult. During frosh week at many North American universities, for instance, freshmen often receive a one- or two-hour workshop about consent. But according to a convincing stack of studies documented by the U.S. Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, this “education” has little to no influence on what happens during the alcohol-saturated parties that follow. Many programs were too short, the CDC concluded, to have any lasting impact, and tended to focus on areas such as legal implications, as if rape is caused “by a lack of awareness of the laws prohibiting it.” Bystander programs which encourage male and female students to shut down sexist jokes or step in at parties when they see risky behaviour have produced promising results, but cultural change, as Prof. Senn points out, is a long-term solution.

Many of the programs are offered too late – especially for young women like Lindsey Boyes. This was a common complaint among participants: Why hadn’t they learned this when they were first exploring their sexuality, and short on confidence?

There is convincing evidence in the research for introducing these types of program much earlier. The CDC research found that the three interventions that proved most successful at reducing harassment and assaults were offered in middle school and high school – suggesting, researchers said, that these younger ages may represent a “critical window” to promote safer behaviour.

But getting the program into schools can be challenging – as Ontario recently learned with the controversy around its new sex education curriculum, which includes information on consent. Prof. Senn had already faced that hurdle, when she offered the program to Windsor high schools; while the public board declined, she says, the Catholic board allowed the program provided she drop the final class on sexuality and relationships. Prof. Senn says the waiting lists to attend were so long they had to add extra sessions. Given that about half of the rapes women experience happen before they are 18, she says, “adapting the program for girls in high school is a priority.”

The program is not the full answer, researchers say, but it’s an immediate real-world approach. “We shouldn’t just sit around and wait for a cultural shift that isn’t happening,” says Lise Gotell, a women’s study professor at the University of Alberta who is familiar with the new Canadian study, and aware of the criticisms levelled at a women-centred approach. The larger lesson lies with the intervention’s success. “When constraining women’s actions is still the major way that we can respond to the threat of sexual assault,” she says, “that is an indication of how much more we have to do.”

The program will be offered free to Canadian universities, though schools will have to cover the cost of facilitators, for whom training guidelines are now being developed. In an ideal world, says Prof. Senn, “this program would be available to all first-year women students until we don’t need it any longer – that is, when sexual violence ends.”

Posted in Health and Wellness, Life Strategy, Newsletter

Wile E. Coyote

Posted in Cartoons, Newsletter
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